Architecture in turbulent times – part 2

This post will follow on from the previous ‘Architecture in turbulent times’ post covering some of the shifting demands on architects and further highlighting ways we can add value even during this tougher economic period.

The first thing to do is ensure you understand the shifting demands on the architect, and the business; doing this will ensure you remain at the centre of major IT decisions, either by making or advising on those decisions.

These changing demands may include areas such as;

–         Reducing project costs and doing more with existing or even less resource (as per the previously mentioned increasing efficiencies), with many businesses having a strong focus on reducing or managing Opex (Operating expenses).

–         Maintaining and encouraging talent, this may sound strange in the current environment, but keeping and providing a career path and training for talented employees is key during tough times.  Use this as an opportunity to train, mentor and encourage others in your department.

–         Outsourcing – in line with innovation and cost efficiency, are there repeatable processes that could be outsourced? Do new technologies and services such as Platform as a Service enable the outsourcing of technology to manage / reduce costs?

Use and develop your skills in areas including;

–         Negotiation and inspiration – this will enable you to gain buy in for your vision / plans, and get people motivated to drive changes forwards.

–         Problem solving / issue assessment – the ability to quickly and where required tactically resolve problems is more important than ever, and the architects ability to do this while looking holistically at the bigger picture is where we can add great value.

–         Understanding the business and their processes is as always a key component of the architect’s role.  We love technology, but it is the understanding of the business requirements and the ability to provide the simplest and most cost effective technical solutions to these requirements rather than just technology itself that is critical.

We need to think more tactically while still maintaining a holistic view of our business and the environment in which it trades (e.g. relevant regulatory considerations).  In this way the role of the architect remains key, and will ensure that the current technical solutions meet the business requirements of now around optimisation and simplification while being flexible enough to allow the business to grow and capitalise on any improvements in the economy.

I am thinking of the new focus as being tactically strategic, or strategically tactical! 

K

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Author: Kevin Fielder

Innovative and dynamic security professional, with a passion for driving change by successfully engaging with all levels of the business. I am a determined individual with proven ability to provide security insights to the business, in their language. These insights have gained board buy in for delivering security strategy aligned to key business goals. This is achieved by understanding the need to drive change through people, process and technology, rather than focusing exclusively on any one area. I take pride in being a highly articulate, motivational and persuasive team-builder. I have a strategic outlook with the ability to engage with and communicate innovative and effective security solutions to all levels of management. Along with a proven ability to translate security into business language and articulate the business benefits I am also passionate about leading security innovations and making security a key part of the business proposition to its customers. Security should be made a key differentiator to drive sales and customer retention, not just a cost centre! Outside of work I am a proud husband and father to an awesome family, and a passionate CrossFit coach and athlete.

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