Consumerism of IT..

I have recently been asked a few times, by multiple companies, for my thoughts on the trend for consumerism of IT, and more importantly what it means for IT departments.  This is likely due to consumerism being up there as one of what seem to be the top three buzz terms at the moment;

– Cloud

– Consumerism of IT

– BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)

Putting cloud to one side for a moment as I like to cover that separately, consumerism of IT and BYOD are to me very linked so let’s discuss them both together.

First I’ll briefly cover what consumerism and BYOD are, then in a subsequent post I’ll give my thoughts on their current and future impacts on IT (or ICT as is now becoming the more common term) departments.

What is Consumerism of IT?

–         Consumerism of IT is concerned with the blurring of the lines between consumer and business IT devices.  Obvious examples include smartphones that can easily provide access to both personal and work emails from a single device, and tablet PCs such as the iPad that can be used for viewing and updating business presentations and emails along with consuming media and accessing the internet as a personal device.  The fact that devices like these have been driving change in the business world via their use as consumer devices is leading to the consumerism of IT.

What is BYOD?

–         BYOD refers to the moves of some businesses / IT departments to allow users to bring their own equipment such as a laptop rather than using company owned laptops.  As an example; this is often part of a program where the company would provide a budget for the staff to purchase a laptop, with certain rules such as 3 year extended support must be bought, the staff would then be able to use the laptop as both their own personal device and as their business laptop.  This can also often applies to other devices such as tablets and most commonly phones / smartphones.

While technically the two things can be taken in isolation it is the consumerism that aids BYOD in many circumstances – if smartphones couldn’t easily sync to business and personal email systems at the same time there would be limited desire from users to make use of a BYOD phone policy. However this ability enables users to carry a single rather than multiple phones so has obvious benefits to them while also offering business benefits such as lower costs and reduced management overhead.

K

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Author: Kevin Fielder

Innovative and dynamic security professional, with a passion for driving change by successfully engaging with all levels of the business. I am a determined individual with proven ability to provide security insights to the business, in their language. These insights have gained board buy in for delivering security strategy aligned to key business goals. This is achieved by understanding the need to drive change through people, process and technology, rather than focusing exclusively on any one area. I take pride in being a highly articulate, motivational and persuasive team-builder. I have a strategic outlook with the ability to engage with and communicate innovative and effective security solutions to all levels of management. Along with a proven ability to translate security into business language and articulate the business benefits I am also passionate about leading security innovations and making security a key part of the business proposition to its customers. Security should be made a key differentiator to drive sales and customer retention, not just a cost centre! Outside of work I am a proud husband and father to an awesome family, and a passionate CrossFit coach and athlete.

2 thoughts on “Consumerism of IT..”

  1. Great post – a very topical issue. One of the big challenges coming up with BYOD is how quickly new devices are being released and how quickly people, as consumers, are moving to the next versions. And the demand this then places on the IT (or ICT as you say) departments and businesses to keep up!

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